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Central banks detail CBDC expectations in massive joint document

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With Central Bank Digital Currencies a point of focus across the globe, a number of countries’ banking authorities have jointly produced a document discussing the currency type at length. 

The Bank for International Settlements told Cointelgraph in a statement that a group of seven central banks and the BIS had collaborated on the report, “identifying the foundational principles necessary for any publicly available CBDCs to help central banks meet their public policy objectives.” The BIS is a global institution helping out national central banks.

CBDCs have been a hot topic in 2020, with a number of countries expressing interest in the asset type. China has pushed forward with plans for its CBDC, the digital yuan, although China’s central bank did not contribute to the report. China is in the midst of testing its digital asset, and has completed approximately $162 million USD worth of digital yuan transactions. 

The Bank of England, the U.S. Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan sit among the governing bodies involved in crafting the document, titled: Central bank digital currencies: foundational principles and core features. However the statement from the BIS made it clear that the involved parties had not included opinions in the report regarding the launch of such a currency, nor did they specify any firm plans for producing such an asset. 

The report clarified:

“This report is not about if or when to issue a CBDC. Central banks will make that decision for their jurisdictions (in consultation with governments and stakeholders). None of the central banks contributing to this report have reached a decision on whether or not to issue a CBDC.”

The report listed a trio of necessary fundamental principles upon which a future CDBC, and its related ecosystem, should be founded, if such an asset arises.

“A central bank should not compromise monetary or financial stability by issuing a CBDC; (ii) a CBDC would need to coexist with and complement existing forms of money; and (iii) a CBDC should promote innovation and efficiency.”

The document clarified that vital components of sound CBDCs include convertibility, convenience, security, speed, scalability, legal soundness and several other categories.

Brazil’s central bank has also expressed interest in a CBDC in recent months, although the report also did not list Brazil’s central bank as a contributor. In contrast, the Bank of Japan does grace the list of reported contributors. Japan boasts a team tasked with studying CBDCs. 



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London Stock Exchange-listed firm inks FCA’s approval for crypto services

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Mode Global Holdings, a London Stock Exchange-listed fintech group, has secured major regulatory approvals for cryptocurrency and fintech operations in the United Kingdom.

The company announced Thursday that Mode has secured its Electronic Money Institution license and AMLD5 registration from the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority.

The AMLD5 registration has been granted to Mode’s crypto arm Fibermode Limited, establishing it as an official crypto asset firm in the United Kingdom, pursuant to the amended regulations on money laundering, terrorist financing and transfer of funds.

The AMLD5 registration is a requirement for crypto-related businesses in the country that fall within the scope of money laundering regulations. According to the announcement, Mode is the fifth company to have received this registration to date since the FCA became the official AML supervisor of the crypto industry in the U.K. in January 2020.

Alongside the AMLD5, Mode’s subsidiary Greyfoxx Limited also acquired the EMI license, which enables Mode to offer a “range of innovative financial services” to both businesses and consumers in the United Kingdom, the announcement notes.

Following the acquisition of new regulatory approvals, Mode is planning to further expand its crypto services, including decommissioning its investment product known as the “Bitcoin Jar.” The product aims to allow Mode customers to use Bitcoin (BTC) to generate BTC interest rather than simply holding it in a wallet or on an exchange.

Mode CEO Ryan Moore noted that the new regulatory developments provide a major step in Mode’s mission to deliver a trusted and regulated environment. “It means we now have the ability to scale our operations and continue delivering innovative payments products for our customers under our own EMI licence. Both the EMI licence and the AMLD5 registration ensure business transparency, strong oversight and give our customers confidence in our offering,” he said.

Related: UK regulator warns against 111 unregistered crypto companies… and FOMO

The latest news comes shortly after a member of the British Parliament pointed out major difficulties in the process of registering crypto firms under the FCA’s AML regulations in late May. Economic secretary John Glen elaborated that FCA was not able to process and register all applications by its previous deadline due to a significant number of firms failing to adopt robust AML control frameworks as well as employ proper staff.